13 experts on what makes an advanced motorcycle rider

I’ve wanted to write an article about what makes someone an advanced rider for a while, but instead of just giving my own opinion I thought it would be better to ask some expert riders for their opinion on the matter.

Note: This was my first ever time interviewing a set of experts, and my process was not optimal. I asked both what makes someone an advanced rider, and how you recognize an advanced motorcycle rider on the road. My questions were unfortunately quite vague, and I changed the wording a few times in the middle of sending emails.

Keep in mind that some of the experts were really busy, and some took time of their holiday to reply to my emails. In my emails, I asked for a 1-3 sentence reply, which is why some experts mentioned just a single factor in a single sentence, while others mentioned almost all the listed factors over the course of multiple paragraphs. Some experts not mentioning certain factors doesn’t mean they don’t find them important, it may just be that it isn’t the single most telling difference between beginner and advanced riders to them.

To summarize, any errors made are 100% mine. Despite that, I still believe this article holds quite some valuable insights.

I’ve read through all the answers multiple times, and I’ve tried to see which “factors” are mentioned multiple times by the experts. Overall, I found 6 different factors that contribute to the difference between beginner and advanced motorcycle riders, each of them mentioned by at least 5 of the 13 experts.

expert mentions of advanced rider factors

I’ll discuss each factor separately, and where applicable I’ll dig a bit deeper to see what the experts mention as examples for a certain factor. Take for example safety. Safety was mentioned 10 times, but within that category, there is quite a difference between for example what gear you use, and how careful you are on the roads. Wherever possible, I’ve analyzed which subfactors were mentioned within bigger factors such as “Safety”.

After discussing each factor briefly, I’ve added all the expert responses, followed by my personal conclusion. I hope you enjoy reading this as much as I enjoyed making this.

Safety

red-cross-safety-advanced-riders

Safety was the most commonly mentioned difference between beginner and advanced riders. With 10 out of 13 experts proactively mentioning safety one way or another. The most commonly named safety-related factor was awareness, which 8 of the experts mentioned as being (one of) the main difference(s) between beginner and advanced riders. I’ve added awareness separately below and will discuss the factors of awareness there.

However, awareness was not the only safety-related mentioned difference between beginner and advanced riders. Four experts mentioned quality gear as a way to recognize more advanced motorcycle riders, and two mentioned additional training specifically aimed at safety. Lastly, bike-handling skills were mentioned four times in relation to safety.

what-10-experts-mention-about-safety-factors

There is some overlap because a few motorcycle experts mentioned multiple ways to differentiate between beginners and more advanced riders, all within the safety category. One example would be Steve from The Road to Nowhere, who says (partial quote):

Most of the time it’s quite easy to spot a new rider on the road as they are usually doing all the wrong things. To fast on twisty roads they haven’t been on with poor lines turning in too soon which makes them run wide near the exit, bad body positioning, or poor throttle control in corners. What do I mean by that? Well here is a beginner rider you can see his sloppy throttle control:

He is hard on the front brake then lets off then puts on power again then chops throttle again, then loses the front and as a result ends in a low side crash due to much pressure on the front tire at that speed and lean angle. I’ve heard new riders say ‘I had to lay it down’. Really WTF, where did you learn this skill. It’s not taught at any riding school I have ever done. This is just their way of coming to terms with what happened because they probably don’t know why they crashed.

My advice to new riders is, get to your nearest race track and do a couple of schools like California superbike school or similar and read Keith Codes a twist of the wrist, it’s the riding bible for any new rider. You should also go out and buy the best possible safety gear that you can afford, don’t just go for cheap stuff. Good gear is expensive but it’s well worth it.

The first two paragraphs are about the importance of motorcycle handling, while the last paragraph stresses the importance of both additional training and high-quality gear.

Smoothness

The second most commonly mentioned factor was “smoothness”. Advanced drivers tend to wobble less, make nice curves and generally ride more smoothly than beginners. 8 of the 13 motorcycle experts mentioned this factor proactively. Sometimes in relation to safety (motorcycle control) and sometimes more generally (smoothness of corner lines for example).

When it comes to the specific factors that contribute to smoothness and how you can recognize an advanced motorcycle rider, the following factors were mentioned.

8-experts-on-what-is-most-important-when-it-comes-to-smoothness

The most commonly mentioned smoothness factor is taking smooth corner lines. Beginner riders often have trouble taking good corners. A few of the common mistakes beginners make are: going too fast into the corner, turning in too soon (resulting in running wide near the exit), braking too late (instead of while the bike is still upright), braking to stay in lane, and not looking forward enough.

The second most commonly mentioned issue when it comes to riding smoothly is swerving, shaking, and wobbling by beginners. This happens most often in corners and at low speeds. Especially when stopping in front of a traffic light (and driving away from one) beginners tend to swerve a bit more.

Starting, stopping, and staying in neutral was mentioned three times, which has some overlap with the swerving, shaking and wobbling category. One specific factor is to look at how long their feet stay down.

Finally, throttle control was mentioned twice, although keep in mind there is a big overlap between smooth corner lines, not wobbling, good throttle control, and stopping / starting. Poor throttle control can cause all the above maneuvers to go a lot less smoothly as they should, but it is not necessarily poor throttle control in all the cases.

For an example of what isn’t smoothness, watch the video in Steve’s quote (scroll a bit up).

Awareness

Out of the 13 motorcycle experts, 8 mentioned awareness as one of the main differences between beginner and advanced motorcyclists. There aren’t any strong subcategories when it comes to awareness, although some experts list different examples than others. The main line of thought is nicely summarized in the first sentence from Ry Austin’s (www.twowheelstothere.com) answer:

To me, an advanced rider is one who is obviously fully aware of their surroundings and the conditions and who rides accordingly.

When it comes to in what situations you can see the difference between beginner and advanced riders, the experts did list a large variety of situations in which you can see advanced riders:

  • Checking where other riders are going (their front wheel position for example)
  • Changing lane position depending on other riders
  • Keeping solid space margins
  • Correct sightlines during corners and other maneuvers
  • Taking lane dominance when needed (and not unnecessarily giving it away)
  • Being careful around potential obstacles, a water pool could be an oil spill for example
  • Staying super alert at all times

Experience

Until now not every expert may have said every item above, but at least whenever they did talk about it, they all agreed. When it comes to experience, there is one slightly different opinion.

Out of all the experts, there were 8 which explicitly named experience as a major factor in the difference between a beginner and an advanced rider. A few experts even used the terms “advanced rider” and “experienced rider” interchangeably.

Also, a few experts mentioned that not all miles are equal. Take for example Cyril Huze from www.cyrilhuzeblog.com, who answered on the main difference between beginners and advanced riders:

10,000 miles on the roads/streets, (not the highway)

With 8 experts stressing the importance of practice, it is obvious that it counts for a lot. Still, Troy & Ang (www.ridestopngo.com) warns against solely looking at miles under someone’s belt to determine how advanced they are:

We tend to get into a groove and in that groove, we sometimes find ourselves complacent. Habits that may be hard to break without a refresher course. In essence, if you ask yourself what is right, what am I doing wrong, reference your training and you are able to bring back all that you learned that may set some reminders that will and can save your life while on two wheels. I am and will always be OK with being called a beginner.

Aside from staying humble, Troy & Ang advocate taking refresher courses and watching out for growing too complacent. So don’t just look solely at experience, and don’t become complacent just because you got enough miles to go around the globe a couple of times.

Confidence

confidence-advanced-rider-empty-road

While Troy & Ang advocate staying humble about your riding abilities above, while on your bike you should be confident according to 6 out of 13 experts. Having confidence in the abilities of your motorcycle, knowing where the limits are, and not needing to impress others are a few of the mentioned confidence related factors.

Being confident and staying relaxed are often mentioned in the same sentence. Staying relaxed can help you to improve your reaction time, have a better overview of the current situation, and will allow you to ride more smoothly, according to the experts.

Learning oriented

Being learning oriented surprised me a bit. This item is a whole lot more specific than things such as “experience”, “safety”, or “confidence”. To still have 5 experts mention it explicitly is a lot. Multiple experts recommend taking advanced courses, even if you have plenty of miles under your belt already. Aside from official courses, a strong focus on constant learning and improving your skills is frequently mentioned. You can get a lot of valuable feedback just by asking more advanced riders, and by trying out different maneuvers (in a safe situation). One example of an answer that focuses heavily on continued learning comes from Sash from www.sashmouth.com:

What makes one an advanced rider is consistent experience, constantly learning, and improving one’s skills. A rider will not grow if they are not always learning from more experienced riders and/or taking skills courses. It’s important to listen to good advice and then apply it and determine what you understand and what you don’t.

Ask many questions and try everything for yourself.

….

In short, what changes a beginning rider to an advanced rider would be the willingness to learn and apply their knowledge. Never stop learning!

What was not proactively mentioned?

police-car-rules-advanced-rider

It is not only interesting to look at what the experts mentioned, it is also quite interesting in what they didn’t mention. I went out and asked a few non-riders what they thought would be important, and most of them mentioned some form of sticking to the traffic rules. Almost always maximum speed to be exact.

What is interesting is that none of the experts mentioned staying below the legal max speed, while only one mentioned sticking to the traffic rules in general. There are two possible explanations for this:

Firstly, the rules are so obvious that beginner and advanced riders alike will keep them. And when both beginner and advanced motorcyclists do the same, it isn’t something you can use to tell the difference between one and another.

The second explanation would be that just blindly sticking to the traffic rules isn’t going to make you an advanced rider. Motor riding is far more advanced than just a few rules, and just sticking to the rules won’t make you the most advanced rider. Nor the safest.

Personally, I think both explanations have something going for them, but when forced to choose I would go with the second explanation. It’s something I might poll for at a later date, though.

That is it when it comes to my own analysis of the answers. If you want to read the answers yourself (highly recommended), continue reading the “Expert answers” chapter below! Otherwise, you can skip to the conclusion at the very bottom.

The expert answers

I’ve compiled a full list of all the answers here, which are definitely worth reading through. I did mess up the format a bit in some of my emails, which is why some of the answers seem to not answer the question asked. My fault for changing the wording repeatedly.

 

Cyril from www.cyrilhuzeblog.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

10,000 miles on the roads/streets, (not the highway)

How can you see that on the roads?

His riding gear is brand new.

 

Sash from www.sashmouth.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

What makes one an advanced rider is consistent experience, constantly learning, and improving one’s skills. A rider will not grow if they are not always learning from more experienced riders and/or taking skills courses. It’s important to listen to good advice and then apply it and determine what you understand and what you don’t.

Ask many questions and try everything for yourself. If it doesn’t fit you then don’t do it. Sport bikes, adventure bikes, and cruisers do not ride the same. It’s important to adjust your riding style to each type of motorcycle you try. Body types are different as well so those adjustments need to be made.

Consistent practice is crucial. I don’t own a car so I ride my motorcycle just about everywhere. It’s important to ride often and ride in different types of terrain and environments so as to grow as a rider.

In short, what changes a beginning rider to an advanced rider would be the willingness to learn and apply their knowledge. Never stop learning!

How can you see that on the roads?

A lack of trust in the ability of one’s motorcycle. Allow a more experienced rider ride your bike and show you what it is capable of and then trust the bike.

 

Andrew from braaisbeersandbikes.blogspot.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

To me the main difference between a beginner and an expert, or perhaps more applicable to everyday riding; an experienced rider is the attitude towards the bike, the ride and the total experience. The difference between being relaxed and confident, handling the bike well as opposed to someone who is noisy and perhaps over confident but who doesn’t inspire confidence perse’, the kind of person you would let your daughter ride pillion with compared with the one that you would definitely not.

How can you see that on the roads?

To me, the biggest indicator of a rider that is experienced as opposed to one who is not is to watch how he approaches, rides through, and exits a corner.

I have watched inexperienced riders approach a corner without any knowledge of counter steering, they brake too soon and try to steer into a corner without looking though it whereas an experienced rider will find his line as he approaches, he will brake before entering while the bike is still upright, he will counter steer to drop into the corner, find the apex and then accelerate out all the while looking where he wants to go watching for the next corner, keeping it smooth.

The inexperienced rider will not look through the corner but will look at the road in front of his bike, if there is a pothole or an obstacle he will look at it and hit it!

 

Rex from lonestarrider.wordpress.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

Training, Practice, and Time on the road makes an experienced biker.

I have ridden with a lot of groups and the main difference between a beginner and advance rider would be confidence in their riding. You can certainly see the confidence in a rider.

How can you see that on the roads?

You can tell the difference from a beginner or advanced rider from the things that they do. Do they look right and left twice before they make a move. Do their bikes swerve or shake when they look back and make sure they’re lane is clear or do they even look back before they change lanes?

 

Liz from www.pillioness.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

I would say the big difference between an experienced and beginner rider is that experienced riders show more confidence. 

How can you see that on the roads?

They ride more smoothly and know where the traps on the road are (because they’ve fallen into them before). They are more aware of other riders on the road too and ride courteously (and don’t hog lanes). Inexperienced riders tend to ride more nervously and tentatively, and also take more risks because they don’t realize quite how dangerous some moves are.

 

Dar from scootermayhem.blogspot.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

An advanced rider is someone who is always striving to be better and they tend to take courses to expand their skill set. 

How can you see that on the roads?

There is a fluidity and smoothness to their riding and they generally follow the road rules, wear protective gear, because they know in the end what’s at stake.  When I am out riding I can generally spot someone who has had training versus someone who hasn’t.  It usually comes down to the way they handle their bike, stops/starts in traffic, do they pop the bike into neutral when they are stopped, lane position placement, space margins around their bike in traffic, and general riding like shoulder checking and use of turn signals.  All too often there are riders who are fair weather weekend warriors and don’t do much in the line of skill building, they just pull it out of the garage at the beginning of the season and off they go.  Simple things like watching them do a u-turn, I look at their sightlines i.e. where are they looking?  Friction zone use – is their clutch/throttle control smooth? How do they stop, both feet down or in a 3 point stance with right foot up on rear brake? Do they use front and rear brake?  Instructors learn the skill of ‘fault detection’ it’s kind of hard to turn off at times.  I also judge their decision-making process i.e. ‘road sense’ I have seen some pretty scary stuff where people give up lane dominance or make poor decisions with speed and passing.  So it is not so much as being advanced as it is as being well trained, because with lots of riding people’s skills grow, it’s how they nurture them that makes them advanced or forever an average rider or always a beginner because they don’t invest in lifelong learning.

 

Troy & Ang from www.ridestopngo.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

Interesting question you do have. It is funny some friends I know who have been riding many, many years I still consider beginners. In fact, myself at times feel like a beginner. Yes, we have ridden hundreds of thousands of km’s all over North America and certain days are better than others.

We tend to get into a groove and in that groove, we sometimes find ourselves complacent. Habits that may be hard to break without a refresher course. In essence, if you ask yourself what is right, what am I doing wrong, reference your training and you are able to bring back all that you learned that may set some reminders that will and can save your life while on two wheels. I am and will always be OK with being called a beginner

I know this may not directly answer your question but if we all consider ourselves a beginner, even in our sub conscience there will probably be a lot fewer accidents and deaths on the road.

How can you see that on the roads?

(See above)

 

Ry from www.twowheelstothere.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

To me, an advanced rider is one who is obviously fully aware of their surroundings and the conditions and who rides accordingly.

How can you see that on the roads?

A rider weaving at high speeds through dense city traffic might have skills, but he would not strike me advanced.  A rider following too close in stop-and-go traffic does not strike me as advanced.  To me, an advanced rider is one who understands the risks and adjusts accordingly.

 

Brandy from trobairitztablet.blogspot.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

I think experience makes a person more advanced.  Here in Oregon, it is recommended that you not take the Advanced Rider Training class (ART) unless you have 12,000 miles of seat time on a bike. Practice, practice, practice.

I also think a certain maturity also helps. 

How can you see that on the roads?

Two things can usually indicate a beginner.  One is how they start and stop on a bike in parking lots and at stop signs (how long the feet stay down – outriggers) and the other is their lines through the corners.

To notice an advanced rider is usually the speed in the twisties and their perfect lines while doing so.  An amateur does it until they get it right, a professional does it until they can’t get it wrong.   Not my quote but a fitting one. Another indicator is quality of gear. 

Most newer riders buy what they can afford and slowly increase in quality over the years. Someone wearing a $1,000 Aerostich suit has more than likely been riding longer than someone wearing a $50 supermarket quality jacket.  Kind of a stereotype but usually accurate.

 

Warren from motorcycleparadise.blogspot.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

Bit of a difficult thing to answer as there are so many aspects to riding. One core riding skill is counter steering. It is something that I sometimes see a rider does not understand. If riding rather slow and still running wide in corners and braking to remain in their lane then that is someone who is at a beginner level with their riding and would benefit greatly from additional training.

You cannot easily notice an expert rider on the road. They may often have advanced rider training and maybe race track tuition and experience riding off road but most importantly an expert rider has developed a different attitude. They are confident in themselves with no need to impress other riders, ride a particular style or brand.

How can you see that on the roads?

(See above)

 

Sameer from www.fasterandfaster.net

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

  1. Advanced riders are usually more ‘aware’ of their surroundings while riding. They’re super alert, careful and understand the importance of staying focused. They also ‘anticipate’ what could be coming their way next (in terms of changing road conditions, traffic coming from various directions, people trying to overtake and so on..) and are prepared to act accordingly
  2. There is very little substitute for experience. Those who’ve ridden for many years have seen and been through a lot, and that experience guides them – in the speeds at which they ride, in the way they approach a busy intersection, in the way they approach a blind corner, in the way they brake when they see something suspicious on the tarmac (looks like water, but could it be an oil spill?) and the way they modulate the throttle and brakes

How can you see that on the roads?

(See above)

 

Steve from chillerteksr1page.blogspot.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

There are lots of things beginners don’t do that experienced riders do, Road positioning is one of them, either in traffic or on a curvy road. They tend to not look far enough ahead in a corner which sometimes results in them target fixating and running off the road when they could have simply looked through the turn and easily made the bend. Mostly newer riders don’t have any road sense and by that I mean they are not looking for things that other riders do, such as the front wheel of a car at an intersection are they starting to move as I get close which experienced riders usually cover their brakes and position themselves on the road to be able to take evasive action should that car start to move.

How can you see that on the roads?

Most of the time it’s quite easy to spot a new rider on the road as they are usually doing all the wrong things. To fast on twisty roads they haven’t been on with poor lines turning in too soon which makes them run wide near the exit, bad body positioning, or poor throttle control in corners. What do I mean by that? Well here is a beginner rider you can see his sloppy throttle control https://youtu.be/CNfFLuUC1QA

He is hard on the front brake then lets off then puts on power again then chops throttle again, then loses the front and result ends in a low side crash due to much pressure on the front tyre at that speed and lean angle.

I’ve heard new riders say ‘I had to lay it down’. Really WTF, where did you learn this skill. It’s not taught at any riding school I have ever done. This is just there way of coming to terms with what happened because they probably don’t know why they crashed.

My advice to new riders is get to your nearest race track and do a couple of schools like California superbike school or similar and read Keith Codes a twist of the wrist, it’s the riding bible for any new rider. You should also go out and buy the best possible safety gear that you can afford, don’t just go for cheap stuff. Good gear is expensive but it’s well worth it.

 

Experimental Ghost from experimentalghost.wordpress.com

What is the difference between beginner and advanced riders?

Road sense, confidence and being able to stay relaxed.

Being tense on a bike is not a good thing, team that with a challenging situation, like a corner that tightens up, or a car that pulls out on you and it shows

Road sense will tell you that Joe Bloggs is not looking at you, but is looking through you. This, in turn, gives you the confidence to be decisive and either prepare for what might happen or set yourself up to avoid the situation altogether.

The key to both of these skills is to stay relaxed.

Being relaxed will give you better reaction times and will allow you to be much smoother in the execution of what you want to do. You also need to know your bike and how it will respond in any situation and to learn that you need to ride often – not fast or recklessly – just ride often.

You get to know your bike you will relax more and your confidence and road sense will grow from that.

How can you see that on the roads?

That’s easy. A good rider will be smooth in everything they do.

Seasoned riders can tip into a corner and make it look like they are on rails – at any speed, they are decisive and rarely if ever second guess themselves. New riders tend to be rigid and at times a bit wobbly, this is most noticeable in heavy traffic, on round-a-bouts and in shopping centers where they need to take it slow.

Feet up slow speed stuff takes time to master and is something that paves the way for other skills as well.

 

Conclusion

When you ask 13 different experts a few questions, you usually get 13 different answers. When it comes to expert riders, not as much. There was a total of 6 factors that were named, all by at least 5 experts each. Sometimes they gave different examples, but almost always their opinions were in line.

The only aspect that came close to a disagreement was whether while you are on the road you should be “confident and relaxed” or “humble and super alert”. Personally, I think that both can work. Take for example work. Some people perform best when relaxed while others perform better when under some stress, or when close to deadlines. Whether always being super alert or always being relaxed is best for you personally, is up to you to decide. Just keep in mind that heavy city traffic will probably require a more proactive attitude than riding an empty highway.

I hope you all find this as interesting as I did, and I hope you will keep all six factors in mind when hitting the road. There is a lot we can learn from the more advanced riders, and it would be a pity to waste their words. Especially considering our life depends on it. Enjoy the roads, but please keep it safe.

14 thoughts on “13 experts on what makes an advanced motorcycle rider

  1. I’m not really a expert ha-ha but thanks. Interesting the way your open questions were interpreted and the responses.

    I’ll second Twist of the Wrist as suggested by Steve. I did advanced rider and track tuition before I got my licence – because I nearly killed myself as a learner – but it did not really click until I read Twist of the Wrist as some people need the science as well as the practical and visa-versa.

    I’ll also say that the best learning I had was two years off road riding dirt, sand and farm paddocks. Nothing advanced my riding as much as learning bike control on loose gravel or slippery grass. If you want to ride fast on tar, ride dirt, as all the skills there of backing it in at grip level limits then power drifting out of corners and generally having no fear of the bike being constantly loose underneath you are transferrable to tar. But take it to the track naturally.

    • Warren, you’ve been blogging about motorcycling for over a decade already! There’s no need to be that humble about it. 😉

      Thank you for your participation, and keep up your blog! I hope to visit Japan someday as well. For time being you’ll have to enjoy it for the both of us. 😉

  2. Adam,

    Well done! When you ask me the couple of question on this topic, I had no ideal how much you got in to the details of each person you asked. I learned a lot from this article and would like to see more of this.

    I humble that you consider me and thanks for doing this.

    Rex Covington

    • Thank you! Chances are pretty big I will write another article like this one later. Might take me a few weeks or even a few months though. This one took me quite some time.

      Also, same as Warren, you’ve been blogging for over a decade about motorcycling. No need to be that humble about it. 😉 Thank you for your participation and I’m looking forward to asking you some more questions once I find a new topic!

    • Thank you Andrew,

      I’ll hopefully be trying out your Sadza-Cheddar-Bacon cakes soon! Reading your blog makes me pretty hungry. 😉

  3. Adam

    Great article! I blushed at the thought of being considered an advanced rider as I am still relatively new to riding just being at the 5 year mark. I still consider myself in the learning phase even though I am a licensed motorcycle instructor and its through instructing that I have learned there is always room to grow and be better and advance my craft. I regularly take courses and practice consistently. The very nature of my job as an instructor ensures that I am continually training and skill building and it has paid off for me in improving my skill level. it is true about the old adage ‘practice makes perfect’ , but I tell my students “practice makes better” because perfection suggests that there is no more room for improvement or growth and its my personsal feeling the day a motorcyclist says they’ve got nothing left to learn, that’s the day they should hang up the keys. Thanks for the great article.

    • You’re very welcome! Thank you for participating. I’m starting to get the feeling no-one considers themselves an expert ever. Which in my opinion is a good thing while on roads.

      But when talking with less experienced riders, we should all be a little bit less afraid of giving some helpful feedback, because even if we never reach perfection, we can still help others ride a little bit better (and more safely).

      And thank you for all the kind words. It’s very encouraging. I’ll definitely try to find the time to write another big article somewhere soon.

    • You’re welcome! To be honest, I don’t consider me a writer / author or scientist either. But I’m not letting that stop me. 😉

  4. Nice article Adam, and I also am certainly no expert. I wasn’t sure why you were asking me these questions to begin with but now it all makes sense. You certainly have put a lot of thought and effort into this post and it was a good read. Good work keep it up.

  5. Howdy, Adam!

    I’m not too surprised that your experienced rider participants had similar responses, and I’m not the least bit surprised that most—if not all—of them would not call themselves (and would shy away from being called) “experts” or even “advanced riders” (unless by “advanced” you mean aged 😀 ). After all, an ego can be a grave liability—whatever one’s talent, profession, hobby, you name it.

    What did surprise me, and what kept me interested in your article, was your analysis: You took narratives from 13 sources and effectively quantified that information—you converted words and ideas into relevant numbers… Interesting, unique approach, man. Well done!

    • Thank you for your kind words Ry, and I’m glad you find my article useful. I’ll write an update somewhere soon (received two more responses), and I’m thinking about the next topic to write about. I’ll make sure to ask you (and all the other respondents) again if you got the time. 🙂

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